Randal Ford spent the last ten years exploring our deep-rooted emotional connection with animals through the lens of portraiture. Wild animals are typically photographed in their natural habitat, but Ford chose to strip away context by photographing these animals close up and personal in his studio. “Why do we as humans feel something so deeply when we look into the eyes of an animal?” he asks. “My deconstructed form of portraiture is intended to give us a glimpse into the soul of an animal. But what I often find is what we see is a naked glimpse at the most mystical and elusive breed of all–ourselves.”

“Black swan, outlier. Black swan, unpredictable. Black swan, extreme impact. It is said a small number of black swans explains almost everything in our world, from the success of ideas and tradition, to the dynamics of historical events, to elements of our own personal lives. What’s your black swan?”

“Schicka was my first large cat to photograph in studio. Large cats in studio are an experience unlike anything else. The combination of power and grace is tangible. They command respect and one wrong move can make things escalate quickly. I remember distinctly when Schicka’s trainers removed her leash and asked her to walk to the mark. The way she walked was so graceful, and stunningly beautiful. But I was in the middle, at her mercy. The feeling that I could be prey was chilling. She received fresh, uncooked meat as her reward between takes. I only work with trainers who show a great amount of respect for the animals and are incredibly thoughtful with their care. Schicka’s owners not only treat her with dignity but also love. It was obvious there’s an ongoing relationship of trust and appreciation.”

“Compared to his brother, Amari was a bit more calm and relaxed on set. I thought it would be interesting to see Amari in a very human position. He was agreeable and was happy to pose for us. Inspired by the famous picture of Burt Reynolds for Cosmopolitan magazine in 1972.”

“Penelope liked to dance, but once the lights came on she owned the shoot. Birds are one of my favorite subjects and Penelope had the whole crew’s attention with her elegance and majesty. I wanted to show different tones of gray and also the textures of her feathers so I highlighted her with directional lighting. She was truly a royal subject.”

“Catalina made me just as nervous as some big cats. But sometimes you get one frame with just the right pose. And I consider myself lucky to have capturedCatalina in this pose. We had limited time with her because, well, she’s not only abig bird but also a fast one. And ostriches can be very dangerous. Although theyare considered prey to big cats, their defense mechanism is to raise their massivetalons and kick the hell out of a predator. In order to keep her safe and us safe,Catalina’s trainers brought in a 20 x 20 metal fencing to set a perimeter around her. As we shot, the trainers would open and close the fence.”

“Maverick had mighty horns. He had a set much curvier that most steers. And they were so perfectly symmetrical that I really focused on their shape when composing my frames. Maverick is a Fort Worth native and you can find him hanging out near the stockyards year-round keeping the peace.”

“With a name like Garth, what’s not to like? This masculine cock strutted in the studio with his feathers up, looking for ladies. Fortunately for us, there were none–just some boring seed for the good-looking guy. He certainly posed for us though, and I loved how the light picked up with the classic Americana colors of his coat.”

“Wolves don’t walk, they prance. And Geronimo did just that. He danced around the studio, sniffing us all briefly and posed for us for only a few minutes and then he was ready to leave. 


People often ask what animal is most memorable to me.  All of them are in their own way. But during this process, I often found I related to wolves the most.  Wolves run in packs and stick together but there is often a lone wolf who leaves the pack to go out on his own. I’ve never been one to conform to norms and typically march to the beat of my own drum… so maybe I’m a bit of a lone wolf myself.”

“Oh boy, who would have thought a sloth would be so challenging? Perry, which is short for Perezoso (lazy in Spanish), was a character. Most of my subjects can either stand on their legs or sit upright. Sloths, on the other hand, do neither. They lay or they hang, that’s it. It was impossible to create a shot of Perry laying because he just melted into the floor. However, once I saw him hang, the light bulb went off, THAT was the shot. Despite his namesake, he moved constantly, literally spinning, which made it super challenging for me to capture just the right moment. After working patiently with him I laughed at the irony of my hyperactive sloth and finally captured a shot I was happy with.”

“Jabari, bedhead, messy teenager. Part of the interest of this shot is that he has a young mane growing in. This is so indicative of a teenager, which I guess in lion years, Jabari was right on schedule. The messiness, the awkwardness, and the length all cue the audience to his age and demeanor. Like a teenager, he was all over the place when we photographed him. Some animals sit still for me and I can capture plenty of images. But Jabari only sat still a few times, and I only captured a few decent shots. His size was small enough to know he was young but still big enough to intimidate me as an observer.”

“What a Gertrude. Similar to a yak, Highland cows have long, beautiful shaggy hair. Per their name, they are originally from the Highlands of Scotland. Most Highlands are redheads but Gertrude was a blonde beauty. I loved how her locks covered up her eyes, and in this frame I selected, she tilted her head slightly as if she was telling me something. My affinity for cows definitely holds true with these beautiful Highlands and this portrait of pretty Gertrude is hanging in my house.”

“This is a classic foal pose as they bend down to eat. It has the grace of a deer but shows the muscular precision Weston will grow into. We were very lucky to capture this pose.”

“Yohan and his fifth gear. I grew up a track and field sprinter, and consequently I have always had a love for cheetahs so it was amazing to see Yohan in person. He was distinguished and calm. He resides outside of Dunlap, California, at one of the most amazing large-cat sanctuaries I’ve ever seen. The founder of the organization is continually pushing efforts for large-cat conservation and protection. On our outdoor mobile studio, Yohan was easy going, interested in playing with a large-cat toy, chasing it around like he was a cub. At the sanctuary, they have a 400-square-yard open area for Yohan to show off his speed.”

Randal Ford is an internationally recognized photographer whose works have appeared on the cover of major publications including Time Magazine, andCommunication Arts, the advertising industry’s most respected publication. He has also been commissioned to create photographs for many of the most famous brands in the world such as Anheuser-Busch, Comcast, Frito-Lay, L.L.Bean, Verizon, Pfizer, and Pepsi.

Ford has become increasingly involved in the fine art realm with his series of animal portraits. This collection took him about five years to create, although he shot his first portrait of a cow more than 10 years ago. In 2017, these portraits were awarded first place and best of show in the fine art category of the esteemed International Photo Awards competition. In the fall of 2018, renowned publisher Rizzoli released his book The Animal Kingdom, which is currently the No. 1 best seller in photography books on Amazon.

SLOAN MIYASATO FINE ART

Located in the heart of San Francisco’s vibrant art and design district, Sloan Miyasato Fine Art is a contemporary art venue offering a user-friendly alternative to the white walls of traditional art galleries by helping collectors more easily envision art in their homes or other environments. 

Founded in 1997 by Bay Area art advisor Michelle Bello, and set inside one of the city’s most venerable design showrooms, the program features a rotating collection of art installed in distinctive vignettes filled with world-class furnishings. Bello brings more than 25 years of professional art market expertise, both as a former director of two contemporary art galleries, and currently as an independent art advisor, to curate her selection of works by emerging and mid-career artists, along with museum-quality pieces by established names.

Ed Moses, Grid-Y, 2014, Mixed Media, 66 x 54 Inches

This winter we turn our spotlight on an important and quintessential Grid painting by the internationally renowned American artist Ed Moses whose recent passing left a giant hole in the heart of the art world. For collectors in the mood to make a serious acquisition, there is no better time for a Moses Grid painting of this caliber.

We are equally proud to shine a bright light on the next generation of talent who grace our walls. View work by the wonderful artists below, along with work by dozens of other artists in our collection. We hope art will bring joy to you, and joy to the world.

Ed Moses, Grid-Y, 2014, Mixed Media, 66 x 54 Inches, Sloan Miyasato Installation View

First championed by the celebrated Ferus Gallery in 1957, Ed Moses achieved international recognition with other gallery artists such as Ed Ruscha, Robert Irwin, and Ed Kienholz. Moses was resolute in his commitment to abstract painting. Driven by process and formal experimentation, Moses described himself as a “mutater,” letting the daily practice of painting lead him to discoveries and new questions. He first began working with the infrastructure of the diagonal grid in the mid-1970s, and would return to the motif throughout his life. In his grids, layered space is interwoven and revealed though lattice-like armature of intersecting bands. Moses scraped, slathered, troweled and washed away his pigments, threading and knitting paint into geometric patterns. His work is held in significant public collections including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Institute of Chicago, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Museum, Washington D.C., Walker Art Center, and Whitney Museum of American Art, and Museum of Modern Art, NY.

Mindy Shapero, Square Vision (orange, black, copper), 2011
Acrylic, Spray Paint, and Copper Leaf on Paper, 48 x 48 Inches

Mindy Shapero, Square Vision (orange, black, copper), 2011, Acrylic, Spray Paint, and
Copper Leaf on Paper, 48 x 48 Inches, Gallery Installation View

As Pulitzer Prize winning art critic Jerry Saltz writes, “Shapero’s amazing feel for color and materials results in a tactile and visually intensive work with a mesmerizing jolt.” The works on paper and sculpture of Los Angeles-based artist Mindy Shapero have been shown at major galleries around the world including Marianne Boesky Gallery, NYC, David Kordansky, Los Angeles, and The Breeder, Athens, Greece. She received her BFA from Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, and MFA from the University of Southern California. Her works have also been exhibited at various institutions such as the Orange County Museum of Art, Rubell Family Collection, Hammer Museum, Wexner Center for the Arts, and Aspen Art Museum.

Casper Brindle, Aura 5, 2016, Acrylic and Metallic Leaf on Panel, 48 x 96 Inches

Casper Brindle, Aura 5, 2016, Acrylic and Metallic Leaf on Panel, 48 x 96 Inches, Gallery View

Casper Brindle, Aura 5, 2016, Acrylic and Metallic Leaf on Panel, 48 x 96 Inches, Detail View

The work of contemporary Los Angeles artist Casper Brindle stems from the Light and Space and Finish Fetish art movements of the 1960s, reflecting the car and surf culture of Southern California. Brindle was mentored by the internationally acclaimed artist Eric Orr, one of the pioneers of the Light and Space movement. In a departure from Brindle’s Strata paintings, he introduces the Aura series. Upon first glance these works appear to be austere white paintings but, viewed from different angles, underlying visual structures begin to emerge. These ghostly forms rise to the surface and seem to vibrate with energy. This visual activity is enhanced by the glowing neon colored halos that radiate from the pieces themselves, extending their presence onto the wall behind them. The enigmatic bars of metallic color which float in the center of each piece inspire quiet reverence, becoming almost sacred in their simplicity. The interpretation of these cryptic monolithic forms is left up to the viewer.

David Becker, Thelonius, 2014, Acrylic on Canvas, 68 x 50 Inches

David Becker, who studied at the Central School of Art in London and the Whitney’s Independent Study Program in New York, has been quietly working in an Oakland warehouse for years, for the most part under the radar, showing rarely, producing a consistently strong body of painting. For all of his studio practice’s independence from the strains of the market, his work could hardly be described as naïve; in fact, it seems to deal with most every sophisticated current in the ongoing discussion of painting’s address to our culture and condition,” says gallerist George Lawson. “He has woven together multiple threads of recent art history and any given organizing principle in the work might depend upon the precedent one chooses to track. From the counterbalance of Alexander Calder’s mobiles, the opaque push and pull of Hans Hoffman’s abstraction, the gossamer layering of Robert Rauschenberg’s Combines, to the kitchen sink inclusiveness of Chris Martin’s post history, it’s all here, supporting a sampler quilt of paint’s possible vernacular range.”

Judith Foosaner, Outside In 9, 2016, Collage with Acrylic on Canvas, 54 x 72 Inches

Judith Foosaner studied with art world masters David Hockney, Elmer Bischoff, R.B. Kitaj, and Mark Rothko while at the University of California, Berkeley, where she received her MA in Art and BA in English. Based in the Bay Area for many years, Foosaner become known for her own mastery of line and shape, both in her paintings and collages. She also taught at the California College of Arts, University of California, Berkeley, and the Wimbledon College of Art in London before retiring from teaching to focus on her art practice. Outside In 9 is a continuation of her long love affair with calligraphy–the lines moving through the space, their variety, density, and nuance. In addition to line, there is shape. And in addition to shape, there is value, space, volume, and movement. Foosaner says, “As I work, and if I’m lucky, rhythm arrives, then more, then more. More luck and choreography announces itself. Necessity has now been met.”

Robert Charles Dunahay, Highway, 2018, Mixed Media on Canvas, 65 x 65 Inches

Robert Charles Dunahay, Crosswalk, 2018, Mixed Media on Canvas, 65 x 65 Inches

Robert Charles Dunahay, Crosswalk, 2018, Mixed Media on Canvas, 65 x 65 Inches, Detail

“Several years ago, I moved from the Bay Area to Palm Springs where I first experienced life in the desert,” says Robert Charles Dunahay. “I was fascinated by the patterns in the little sand dunes that would build up after a windy day. And the desert sand is so fine and silky, I wanted to use it in my work. Eventually I started adding sand to acrylic paint and brushing it onto canvas. Then, it was just a matter of time and experimenting to get to my new series of paintings Highways. Only now I am using crystalline sand rather than desert sand. When used in the context of a Pop Art inspired ubiquitous everyday subject like a section of highway or road, it really works brilliantly! You just want to touch the glittering pavement.”

Diane Tate DallasKidd, Charm, 2018, Hand-knotted Linen Threads,
Acrylic Paint, Marble, Metal Fixture, 44 x 7 x 4 Inches

Diane Tate DallasKidd, Charm, 2018, Hand-knotted Linen Threads,
Acrylic Paint, Marble, Metal Fixture, 44 x 7 x 4 Inches

Diane Tate DallasKidd was born and raised in San Francisco. Upon graduating from San Francisco State University with a BFA in Textile Art, she traveled to Japan to study under 4th generation dyer Tsuyoshi Kuno. Kuno uses centuries old techniques in inventive ways to create cutting-edge textiles for avant-garde fashion designers such as Issey Miyake. Working alongside such a visionary had a lasting impact on DallasKidd’s own artwork. Years later she continues to experiment, creating her own distinctive fiber art in her Sausalito, California studio. Even her modestly sized pieces are deceivingly powerful, evoking tribal fetishes or ancient charms.

Sloan Miyasato Fine Art

Located in the heart of San Francisco’s vibrant art and design district, Sloan Miyasato Fine Art is a contemporary art venue offering a user-friendly alternative to the white walls of traditional art galleries by helping collectors more easily envision art in their homes or other environments.

Founded in 1997 by Bay Area art advisor Michelle Bello, and set inside one of the city’s most venerable design showrooms, the program features a rotating collection of art installed in distinctive vignettes filled with world-class furnishings. Bello brings more than 25 years of professional art market expertise, both as a former director of two contemporary art galleries, and currently as an independent art advisor, to curate her selection of works by emerging and mid-career artists, along with museum-quality pieces by established names.

Curator Michelle Bello is pleased to announce an installation of works by Stephanie Peek entitled Uniform Language, on view now through April 19, 2019, at Sloan Miyasato Fine Art in San Francisco.

In Uniform Language San Francisco based artist Stephanie Peek reclaims various patterns of concealment by recontextualizing the camouflage of troubled countries. With this single grouping of 45 oil paintings on alabaster-gessoed panels, Peek intends to transform these patterns from their military usage to a more peaceful purpose.

Each painting offers viewers a striking abstraction of patterns, leaving them unaware that they are also viewing close-ups of an overall pattern appropriated from military camouflage. Although Peek takes artistic license, they nonetheless reveal the individuality underlying each country’s original design. At first glance, these paintings also appear markedly different from Peek’s signature paintings of flowers and gardens. But, as one looks closely, one sees that all her work is about the perception of the natural environment–from content to pattern, realism to abstraction.

 

Above: Stephanie Peek, Uniform Language, 2001-2018 (Installation View)
Oil on Alabaster-Gessoed Panel, 10 x 10 Inches Each

 

North Korea

 

USA (Night Operations)

 

Iraq (Suicide Commando)

 

Iran (Night Song)

 

Zaire

 

Afghanistan

 

For this series Peek researched the design history and spread of camouflage. She says, “Early in the 20th century, the United States military adapted the nature studies of American painter Abbot Thayer to conceal ships, weapons, and soldiers. Since then, governments throughout the world have hired artists and designers to create camouflage specific to the variety of environments and climates in which they operate. When seen together, these patterns strikingly represent the vast diversity of our natural and man-made environments.”

Peek began painting camouflage patterns in response to 9/11. More recently, political events have caused her to revisit and expand upon that work to create these panels. In the context of today’s political climate, the concept of camouflage reminds us of how political language and action can literally and figuratively conceal threats to our basic human and democratic rights. In this body of work, she suggests that the creation of an enemy is itself an abstraction, and asks us to consider that there may be a deeper pattern uniting us all.

 

Stephanie Peek, Uniform Language, 2001-2017 (Installation View)
Oil on Alabaster-Gessoed Panel, 10 x 10 Inches Each

 

Stephanie Peek, Uniform Language, 2001-2017 (Installation View)
Left to Right, Top to Bottom: USA (Chocolate Chip), USA (Desert), Palestine, Lithuania, Sudan, Cuba
Oil on Alabaster-Gessoed Panel, 10 x 10 Inches Each

 

Stephanie Peek, Uniform Language, 2001-2017 (Installation View)
Left to Right, Top to Bottom: Israel, Russia, Zimbabwe, Iraq (Suicide Commando), Mexico, USA (Allover)
Oil on Alabaster-Gessoed Panel, 10 x 10 Inches Each

 

Artist Stephanie Peek – Frank Wing Photography

 

Peek graduated with an MFA in painting from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in Art History from Wellesley College, Boston. Her work shows regularly in galleries and museums nationally and internationally including the University of California, Berkeley, University of California, San Diego, and the Museo Italo-Americano in San Francisco, the Oakland Museum of California, and the Contemporary Museum of Art in Prato, Italy and is in private collections worldwide. Awards and honors include Visiting Artist at the American Academy in Rome, Borso di Studio in Florence, Italy, J. Ruth Kelsey Travel Grant, Susan B. Irwin Scholarship in the Visual Arts, Virginia McPheter-Stoltz Fellowship, and she has been nominated twice for the SECA award at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

 

Other Available Works by Stephanie Peek at Sloan Miyasato

 

Stephanie Peek, Falling Leaves, 2005, Oil on Linen, 60 x 56 Inches – After an artist’s residency in Florence, Italy, Peek attempted some ambitious paintings of ornate gardens. In trying to simplify the abundance of eye-dazzling flora before her, she painted the pivotal Falling Leaves which led her half-way down the path to painting her camouflage series.

 

Stephanie Peek, Tulipmania, 2013, Oil on Canvas, 45 x 45 Inches

 

Stephanie Peek, Midnight Forest, 2017, Oil on Canvas, 70 x 52 Inches

 

Sloan Miyasato Fine Art

 

Located in the heart of San Francisco’s vibrant design and art district, Sloan Miyasato is a premier destination for distinctive custom furnishings and fine art. For the past 40 years this venerable showroom has offered a portfolio of international furnishings that embodies innovation, excellence, and style, securing its place among the elite sources on the West Coast.

In 1997 independent art advisor Michelle Bello pioneered the first art program to be independently curated inside the San Francisco Design Center, and Sloan Miyasato devoted their galleries as much to contemporary fine art as furnishings. With more than 25 years of professional art market expertise, and as a former director of two San Francisco galleries and longtime art advisor, Bello saw a need to bring fine art directly into the design center, making acquiring art more convenient for busy design professionals and their clients. This venue also offers a user-friendly alternative to the white walls of art galleries, helping collectors more easily envision art in their homes or other environments.

 

Above: Miya Ando, Gold Moon Mandala, 2016, 23k Gold, Pigment, Dye, Urethane, Resin, Stainless Steel, 48″

 

Summer solstice is here and, while others frolic, feast, and celebrate with myriad rituals, we make an offering of art. Our current show is a cosmos of talent.

Observe Joe Brubaker’s Dark Moon works from his latest sculptural phase. David Becker, a newcomer to the gallery, dominates our space with his stellar Black Daisy painting. Diane Tate DallasKidd offers up a fiber piece in bonfire red, and Robert Charles Dunahay’s geometric abstractions glitter like the night sky. Miya Ando’s super moon glows golden whether near or far, while her bodhi leaf meditation mandalas embody the universe with their geometric forms. Sculptor David Kimball Anderson likewise brings flora into our world with his painted steel still life replete with planets–or whatever you wish to see or believe.

Visit Sloan Miyasato in San Francisco to view these works, and 150 more by other artists. With this constellation of fine art, curated by Michelle Bello, the sky’s the limit.

 

 

Sloan Miyasato Fine Art Installation View

 

Diane Tate DallasKidd, Untitled (Red, No.1), 2018
Acrylic Paint on Hand-Knotted Linen Threads, Brass, 44 x 9 Inches

 

David Becker, Black Daisy 1, 2015, (Installation View) Acrylic Paint on Canvas, 86 x 86 Inches

 

David Kimball Anderson, Summer Astronomy, 2018, Bronze, Steel, Paint, 33 x 13 x 12 Inches

 

Joe Brubaker, Dark Moon 3, 2017, Cedar, Black Paint, Rubbed Graphite, 20 x 16 x 3 Inches

 

Robert Charles Dunahay, On Leisurely Drive, 2017, (Installation View)
Mixed Media on Canvas, 64 x 64 Inches

 

Miya Ando, Grey Black White Meditation Mandala, 2018, Dyed, Bodhi (Ficus Religiosa) Skeleton Leaves, Monofilament, Archival Ragboard, 62 x 62 x 2 Inches (Framed)

 

Miya Ando, Red Orange Mandala, Violet Mandala, Murasaki Meditation Mandala, 2015, Dyed Bodhi (Ficus Religiosa) Skeleton Leaves, Monofilament, and Archival Ragboard, 41 x 41 x 2 Inches Each

 

 

Squeak Carnwath, Elvis, 2017, Oil and Alkyd with 24-Karat Gold Leaf
on Canvas over Panel, 70 x 70 Inches

 

 

Sloan Miyasato Fine Art Installation View

 

Never one to shy away from making headlines, Squeak Carnwath is gracing the pages of Nob Hill Gazette as one of four San Francisco Bay Area art icons.

Her distinctive style has long attracted attention with its riot of color, text, patterns, and identifiable images. But for all their humor and playfulness, her paintings also give us pause. Drawing upon the philosophical and mundane experiences of daily life, Carnwath delves deep into our collective subconscious.

Pants on Fire, her most recent series, follows in the footsteps of her earlier works, only on steroids. These are crazy making. We laugh or scream louder and are left speechless. What can you say? Painting them was cathartic for Carnwath who (spoiler alert) in her studio listens nonstop to news and music.

Music has clearly taken center stage with Carnwath’s other recent body of work the Song Paintings. “Basically I am searching for the perfect playlist. It’s fun to turn that into a painting. I love how the song titles turn the works into one big poem.”

Hanging alongside her Liar works and a group of her earlier hits, drop by Sloan Miyasato soon to see these wonderful paintings curated by Michelle Bello. Why?
They sing.

 

 

Squeak Carnwath, Little Baby, 2016, Oil and Alkyd on Canvas over Panel, 30 x 30 Inches

 

 

Squeak Carnwath, Pants on Fire 59, 2017, Oil and Alkyd on Clayboard, 20 x 16 Inches

 

 

Squeak Carnwath, Pants on Fire 32, 2017, Oil and Alkyd on Canvas, 12 x 12 Inches

 

 

Squeak Carnwath, Pants on Fire, Oil and Alkyd on Canvas,
Approx. 12 x 12 Inches Each Variable, Available Individually

 

 

Squeak Carnwath

 

Squeak Carnwath draws upon the philosophical and mundane experiences of daily life in her paintings and prints, which can be identified by lush fields of color combined with text, patterns, and identifiable images. A Professor Emerita at the University of California, she has received numerous awards including the Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art (SECA) Award from San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, two Individual Artist Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Award for Individual Artists from the Flintridge Foundation. She has exhibited widely throughout the country and her work is held in significant public collections including the San Francisco Fine Arts Museum, Yale University Art Gallery, Oakland Museum of California, Microsoft Corporation, Rene and Veronica de Rosa Collection, Brooklyn Museum, Berkeley Art Museum, San Jose Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Metropolitan Museum of Art.