The clouds parted and our art program skyrocketed last year. We added new artists to our roster and showcased more exceptional work. And everywhere we looked we saw the art and design community flourishing. Cheers to all the artists, designers, and clients who make us look good. Their creativity and diligent work build a better and brighter world. Below are a few of our favorite projects from this past year. Imagine what 2016 will bring.
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1_SMFA--Composite_Russian_Hill_Home

Judith Foosaner’s dynamic painting perfectly suits this super sophisticated pied-à-terre designed by David Oldroyd of the powerhouse design firm ODADA (Orlando Diaz-Azcuy Design Associates). Installed in the clients’ entry, the painting’s title Breaking and Entering #14 injects irony into this high-rise project atop Russian Hill. With the space’s breathtaking city views, floor to ceiling glass walls, and austere architecture, Oldroyd also wanted his luxurious furnishings to provide some fun. Everything is playful and inviting. Photography by John Merkl. View more of artist Judith Foosaner’s work at Sloan Miyasato Fine Art here.

1_SMFA--Composite_Nob_Hill

Noted Bay Area designer Dara Rosenfeld created a stylish home away from home for her New York based client who travels regularly to San Francisco. Set like a small, high quality jewel, this petite residence in Nob Hill is the epitome of understatement. Rosenfeld’s pairing of the spare and smart collages by Kathryn Van Dyke with the spaces was brilliant. Both the artist and designer are experts at economy of scale and favor the found object. Rosenfeld mixes contemporary pieces with antiques and treasure hunt finds. Artist Kathryn Van Dyke paints over pages taken from books and manuscript auction catalogues. Photography by John Merkl. View more of Van Dyke’s work at Sloan Miyasato Fine Art here.

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Katano_SMFA_eblast_Jan_2016

This year the San Francisco Museum of Art reopens after undergoing a dramatic expansion. Our curator Michelle Bello is proud to announce SFMOMA has recently acquired a second painting by artist Marc Katano for their collection. This piece is from the same series on view at Sloan Miyasato Fine Art. To view more of Katano’s work click here.

Other artists in the collection of SFMOMA whose work is available at Sloan Miyasato Fine Art include the following:

Tauba Auerbach
Larry Bell
Ross Bleckner
Pegan Brooke
Squeak Carnwath
Mark Erickson
Kota Ezawa
Robert Hudson
Hung Liu
Sean McFarland
Ed Moses
Mimi Plumb
Laurie Reid
Gregg Renfrow
Kathryn Van Dyke
Catherine Wagner

Pricing
Tommy Talbot
(415) 431-1465 tommyt@sloanm.com

Sloan Miyasato
2 Henry Adams Street, Suite 212
San Francisco, CA 94103

Hours
Monday through Friday, 9am to 5pm

Curator
Michelle Bello Fine Art Consulting
(415) 317-5975 info@michellebello.com

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Larry Bell has been breaking boundaries in the art world since the early 1960s, making history in the Light and Space movement of Southern California. Our curator Michelle Bello proudly presents Unbounded, a collection of recent works by Bell and three other dynamic California artists: Joey Piziali, Judith Foosaner, and Casper Brindle. Each artist distinctively explores boundaries in their art now on view at Sloan Miyasato in San Francisco.

Sloan_Miyasato--Larry_Bell_Poster

Throughout his career Larry Bell has made investigations into the properties of light on surface. By experimenting with the nature of surface and its relationship to space, Bell has devised a methodology characterized by spontaneity, intuition, and improvisation. His experiments are primarily concerned with technically advanced material and their potential to challenge and extend the thresholds of perception.

Made from papers, Mylar, and laminated film, his recent collages are seemingly smooth swathes of luminous colors that appear to change from different angles. “Sheets of these materials have been coated with vaporized metals and quartz in a thermal vacuum chamber,” says Bell. “Heat is then applied to the metals. The metals melt, and then gas or vaporize. As this is taking place in a vacuum, there is no resistance to the vaporized metals spreading throughout the chamber and coating the materials. Metals have a crystalline structure as solids. When they gas, and then coat the surface of a material, they retain the same crystalline structure. Crystals and light create rainbows, or light interference colors.”

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Larry Bell
SF 1.30 12A, 2012
Mixed Media on Black Arches Paper
30 x 22 Inches

Larry_Bell--BIO_Composite

Larry Bell in the studio

Larry Bell was born in Chicago in 1939. Having grown up in the San Fernando Valley, Bell attended Chouinard Art School in Los Angeles from 1957 through 1959 where he was a student of Robert Irwin. He was extraordinarily successful as a young artist and showed regularly at Pace Gallery in New York. Bell’s work was also included in the seminal Museum of Modern Art exhibition The Responsive Eye in 1965. His art is in public collections throughout the world including the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City, Art Institute of Chicago, Los Angeles County Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, and Tate Gallery in London.

01_Joey_Piziali--The_Difference_Between_You_and_Me,_2008

Joey Piziali
The Difference Between You and Me, 2008
Acrylic, Ink, and Latex on Canvas
60 x 72 Inches

“This series was influenced by my ongoing appreciation of contemporary architecture,” says artist Joey Piziali. “At the time I was looking at buildings by Rem Koolhaus, like the Seattle Central Library and studies of the CCTV towers in Beijing as well as Norman Foster’s Hearst Tower in New York. I loved the way the buildings performed as massive sculpture, they transform the space around them, engaging unexpected aspects of the urban environment. They create such unique and challenging compositions. They make me rethink what is possible.”

“In a painting I often think about subverting the expectation of a composition,” adds Piziali. “In the painting The Difference Between You And Me, I wanted to present a painting that fully established itself within an expected form, the architecture of the pictorial plane. The painting, composed of a geometric abstract work is floating in a frame of white space. The slashing sprayed lines activate the frame of the image. This gesture disrupts or defaces the image, pushing it to the background while simultaneously becoming a part of painting and engaging the white space. These lines push the composition to the edge of the frame. It’s as if they continue well beyond the painting/object itself.”

03_Judith_Foosaner--Egyptian_Chapter_12,_2014_40in_x_80in

Judith Foosaner
Egyptian Chapter 12, 2014
Collage with Acrylic on Canvas
40 x 80 Inches

“All of my work derives from the ancients,” says artist Judith Foosaner. “The Egyptian Chapter series is the result of an investigation of organic forms, broken and reassembled into geometric units. Each unit combines with the next to express simultaneously, both continuity and interruption. I love the sinuous shapes in combination with the staccato supplied by the geometry. I love the suggestion of what is implicit. Once launched on these pieces, it became clear that their rhythms and the “stacked space” in which they were aligned was suggestive of so much of what I’d experienced with Egyptian hieroglyphs. The visual beauty of this early language never fails to call–this work of mine is its reply.”

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Casper Brindle
Tange, 2014
Acrylic, Automotive Paint, and Resin on Panel
44 x 96 Inches

The paintings of Casper Brindle look as sleek as surfboards and shiny as high beams. Using color-shifting automotive paints and coats of glossy resin, this contemporary Los Angeles artist’s work stems from the Light and Space and Finish Fetish art movements of the 1960s, reflecting the car and surf culture of Southern California. Brindle was mentored by the internationally acclaimed artist Eric Orr, one of the pioneers of the Light and Space movement. Though Brindle’s work cannot be separated from the movement’s practice, it does stand out with its sophisticated studies of atmosphere and vaporous ambiguities that intrigue and compel us to navigate the hazy borders of perception. Subtle horizon lines aide this navigation. His richly hued canvases, composed of bands of softened colors, seem to radiate and extend far beyond the boundaries of the picture plane. Having spent a considerable amount of time on a surfboard, his work also reflects his personal passion for the ocean and skies of California.

Pricing
Tommy Talbot
(415) 431-1465 tommyt@sloanm.com

Sloan Miyasato
2 Henry Adams Street, Suite 212
San Francisco, CA 94103

Hours
Monday through Friday, 9am to 5pm

Curator
Michelle Bello Fine Art Consulting
(415) 317-5975 info@michellebello.com

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Collect art from the comfort of your own backyard this summer. Our curator Michelle Bello has done your homework for you. Enjoy everything from a sizzling hot print by art world superstar Tauba Auerbach to a waggish cool blue bulldog sculpture by archetypal Bay Area artist Bob Hudson to Penny Olson’s sophisticated plaid photographs generated from nature walks in Berkeley’s Wildcat Canyon.

Visit Sloan Miyasato in San Francisco and online here.

Inquiries:
Tommy Talbot (415) 431-1465 tommyt@sloanm.com
2 Henry Adams Street, San Francisco, M-F, 9am-5pm

1_Judith_Foosaner--Aerial_Excursion,_2005_60in_x_60in_Oil_on_Canvas
Judith Foosaner
Aerial Excursion, 2005
Oil on Canvas
60 x 60 Inches

With her emphasis on drawing and its place in the shifting fortunes of painting, Judith Foosaner intensely and relentlessly probes the possibilities of line. Gravity and flight, speed and resistance, weight, pressure, and direction are all present. Dance, music, and literature inform her art. “Certainly my work is greatly influenced by calligraphy–primarily Chinese and Japanese. I don’t know if it’s a correct definition, but my idea of calligraphy is a marriage of line and space. There is rhythm. There is movement. If there is a pause, it is pregnant. Expectant. Each mark calls space into being.”

02_Emily_Lazarre--Night_Run,_2014_27in_x_55in,_36.5in_x_64.5in_(Framed_Size)_Collage,_Oil_Paint_on_Paper
Emily Lazarre
Night Run, 2014
Collage, Oil Paint on Paper
36.5 x 64.5 Inches (Framed Size)

Emily Lazarre cannot remember a time when her mind was not filled with images. The quality of light in a room, the shape of an object in her hands, the color of a linoleum floor, the horizon line delicately separating ocean from sky, a beach in fog. Color is woven into her memory. Blue collides with blue. Darks are pricked with the barest bits of bright green or yellow. As she works, a reverie of drifting remembrances encourages the harmony and dissonance of relative shapes and colors. Breaching the customary confines of the rectangle, images come to life again in her large-scale painted paper collages.


Penny Olson
Wildcat 204, 2013
Dye-Infused Aluminum
33 x 33 Inches

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Penny Olson
Wildcat 200-9-12.3, 2013
Dye-Infused Aluminum
33 x 33 Inches

Penny Olson’s photography based work is an integrated synthesis of the artist’s diverse interests and expertise; digital technology, nature, textiles, reductive aesthetics, and process-driven art. She samples, extrudes, and overlays pixels from her more traditional photographs of plants and landscapes to create striated color fields of emanating light. The original source from nature is unrecognizable but it is suggested through the resulting color palette, luminosity, and the artwork’s title. As is typical for this ever-experimenting artist, Olson uses the latest in digital technology to create her most recent work. For the Wildcat Series she took photographs with an iPad while on walks through Berkeley’s Wildcat Canyon and used these images as the basis for her digital compositions.

Robert_Hudson
Robert Hudson
Blue Dog, 2014
Cast Iron Dog, Shards of Cast Iron with Porcelain Enamel, Steel, Stainless Steel, Epoxy Paint
27 x 26 x 14 Inches

An archetypal Bay Area artist, Robert Hudson has been a primary force in the West Coast Assemblage and Funk Art movements, and is well known for his polychrome steel sculpture. Hudson’s works are characterized by a riotously visual approach as he carefully juxtaposes fabricated and found objects into pieces that burst with his signature wit. The careful geometry of his forms is often painted over in trompe l’oeil designs and decorative patterns as he skillfully manipulates the viewer’s perceptual experiences. Although his sculptures seem to have been thrown together haphazardly, there is so much method to Hudson’s madness that the viewer comes to understand that the method is the madness, a compulsion toward making mundane objects into art while leaving them anchored in the everyday.

01_Jeff_Long--Harlequin,_2015_48in_x_68.5in_Mixed_Media_on_Canvas
Jeff Long
Harlequin, 2015
Mixed Media on Canvas
48 x 68.5 Inches

Elements of Modernist design fuse with motifs of tribal art in Jeff Long’s paintings. If the history of art, in a broad sense, has much to do with codifying our experience of the natural world, Long finds visual parallels among many cultures and in various time frames. Through artists like Matisse and his many artistic descendents, the visual vocabulary of pattern-making, flattened color and hard edges crossed over into mainstream Western art in the 20th Century from societies in which the abstraction of nature was traditional. Long has created a body of work characterized by the distillation of landscape and votive traditions from various cultures. His art expresses humanity’s impulse to connect the optical sense with a feeling for the wholeness of the world.

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Tim Rice
Flow 24, 2015
Oil on Canvas
54 x 58 Inches

Nature is omnipresent in Tim Rice’s intuitive and organic abstractions. Using layer upon layer of oil paint in thin washes results in deep, indefinite, and luminous spaces. His paintings have the quality of filtered sunlight, dappled forest shade, and reflections in a slightly disturbed pond’s surface. “I come to an empty canvas in a spirit of adventure without a specific idea or image in mind. My process is improvisational. My only goal is that the ‘found’ image–through its mood, tension, movement or light–creates its own world and inhabits a palpable space. I remain intuitive rather than mindful in this activity.”

Tauba_Auerbach
Tauba Auerbach
Mesh Moire I, 2012
Color Softground Etching
40.25 x 30 Inches
Edition of 40

Born and raised in San Francisco, Tauba Auerbach is one of the most important artists working in the contemporary art world. Her work is constantly shifting between conceptual art, abstraction, and graphic art. In her recent Mesh Moire etchings, in order to create the nearly pixelated visual interference of two grids slightly out of alignment–which calls to mind a digital photograph taken through a window screen or snapshots of a computer monitor–the artist pressed an elastic mesh directly onto a soft ground, distorting its pattern as it went through the press. As she printed the resulting plates on top of one another in complementary colors (choosing two plates out of a possible seven), the images inevitably aligned slightly differently in each of the prints. Combined, each of the original plates loses its identity as it blends with the other. As the different colored layers overlap and break away from one another, the surface of the print is given a nearly quivering, iridescent quality, a sum more compelling than either of its parts.

6_Judith_Foosaner--Blackbird_Sings,_2008_78in_x_26in_Oil_on_Canvas
Judith Foosaner
Blackbird Sings, 2008
Oil on Canvas
78 x 26 Inches

Pricing
Tommy Talbot
(415) 431-1465 tommyt@sloanm.com

Sloan Miyasato
2 Henry Adams Street, Suite 212
San Francisco, CA 94103

Hours
Monday through Friday, 9am to 5pm

Curator
Michelle Bello Fine Art Consulting
(415) 317-5975 info@michellebello.com

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sloanmiyasatofineart.com
 

Don’t miss Miya Ando’s major new work Elements comissioned by curator Michelle Bello premiering exclusively on the West Coast at Sloan Miyasato in San Francisco.

Michelle, an early champion of Miya’s work, is also proud to announce her art will be featured at the internationally prestigious 56th Venice Biennale and mounted at the historic Museo di Palazzo Grimani. Congratulations, Miya!

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Miya Ando
Copper, Rose Gold, Silver, Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Gold, Pewter, Gold Single, 2014
Aluminum and Pigment
Nine 24 x 24 Inche Pieces (Configuration Variable)
76 x 76 Inches (Configured)
Pieces are also available individually

A descendant of Bizen sword makers, New York-based and Post-Mimimalist artist Miya Ando was raised among swordsmiths turned Buddhist priests in a temple in Okayama, Japan. Half Japanese and half Russian-American, she grew up bilingually within two distinct cultures, spending her childhood between Japan and Northern California. Ando combines traditional techniques of her ancestry with modern industrial technology to transform sheets of steel and anodized aluminum into meditative, abstract paintings.

The foundation of her practice is the transformation of surfaces. Ando produces light-reflecting gradients on her metal paintings by applying heat, sandpaper, grinders, acid, and patinas, irrevocably altering the material’s chemical properties. By an almost meditative daily repetition of these techniques, she is able to subtract, reduce, and distill her concept until it reaches its simplest form. For her, the paradoxical pairing of metal with spiritual subject matter is intentional.

“My work is an exploration into the duality of metal and its ability to convey strength and permanence, yet in the same instance, to absorb shifting color and capture the fleetingness of light. It reminds us of the transitory nature of all things in life,” says Ando.


Miya Ando
Copper, Rose Gold, Silver, Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Gold, Pewter, Gold Single, 2014 (Installation View)
Aluminum and Pigment
Nine 24 x 24 Inche Pieces (Configuration Variable)
76 x 76 Inches (Configured)
Pieces are also available individually


Miya Ando
Rainbow, 2014
Aluminum and Pigment
48 x 48 Inches

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Miya Ando – Changing all the Rules.
Directed by Takeshi Fukunaga
4:10 Minutes


Miya Ando

Miya Ando is the recipient of many awards, including the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant. Her work has been exhibited extensively around the world, including in a recent show curated by Nat Trotman of the Guggenheim Museum. Ando has produced numerous public commissions, most notably a thirty-foot-tall commemorative sculpture in London built from World Trade Center steel to mark the ten-year anniversary of 9/11. She lives and works in New York.

Pricing
Tommy Talbot
(415) 431-1465 tommyt@sloanm.com

Sloan Miyasato
2 Henry Adams Street, Suite 212
San Francisco, CA 94103

Hours
Monday through Friday, 9am to 5pm

Curator
Michelle Bello Fine Art Consulting
(415) 317-5975 info@michellebello.com

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Lydia Panas
Papayas, 2010
Digital C-Print
30 x 30 Inches, Edition of 5
19 x 19 Inches, Edition of 10

Sloan Miyasato Fine Art presents photographs by Lydia Panas, curated by Michelle Bello. Panas says this about these works: “I am interested in the facades people present to hide things about themselves. I look for the smallest details to understand what might lie underneath. My pictures are not so much portraits of the models, as a view of interior life. In this series of portraits I constructed a system where food becomes a barrier, symbolic of the obstacles we create to disguise our intimate feelings. It is not the models’ faces that suggest the emotion, but the way the food is presented. Together the portraits in this series present a feast: fruit, pasta, meat, vegetables. We are not sure whether they provide nourishment or taunt us with the gifts.”

Panas’s work has been exhibited widely, including at the National Portrait Gallery, London, the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, and the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. The recipient of a Whitney Museum Independent Study Fellowship, her work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Brooklyn Museum, and Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago.


Lydia Panas
Digital C-Prints, 2010
Each 30 x 30 Inches, Edition of 5
Each 19 x 19 Inches, Edition of 10

Pricing
Tommy Talbot
(415) 431-1465 tommyt@sloanm.com

Sloan Miyasato
2 Henry Adams Street, Suite 212
San Francisco, CA 94103

Hours
Monday through Friday, 9am to 5pm

Curator
Michelle Bello Fine Art Consulting
(415) 317-5975 info@michellebello.com

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sloanmiyasatofineart.com